Covenant Faculty Invents Automatic Sanitiser Dispenser

Covenant Faculty Invents Automatic Sanitiser Dispenser

 

While the world continues its search for a workable vaccine for the treatment of COVID-19, the infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus, governments and non-governmental organisations in different countries also continue with efforts at sensitising the public to how they can avoid contact with the disease.

Inspired to contribute his quota to the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, a senior faculty at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Covenant University, Professor James Omoleye, has come up with an automatic sanitiser dispenser.

The dispenser, according to him, was made of locally sourced electronic and building materials. It saved time and was the best dispenser to use, apart from the very expensive spraying chamber, in a place where many people converge at the same time, such as schools and religious houses.

While speaking on what informed his decision to come up with the invention, Professor Omoleye, a serial inventor, explained: “For now, the dispenser is the fastest way to use in a place where you have many people. You cannot tell them to wait for 30 seconds, one person after the other when you have thousands of people to attend to before entering the hall. So, the sanitiser put in a dispenser is the one that you can put quickly, then 2 to 3 seconds you go. So it can be used for many people. We decided to look into a dispenser that can dispense the sanitiser without any body contact and also fast.

“How does it operate? It uses battery and electricity. When it uses electricity, it will be charging its battery. When there is no electricity, it continues to use its battery. That battery, when it’s fully charged, it can serve over 3000 people. We put there the capacity to hold 4 litres of sanitiser, which will serve about 5000 people before you’ll need to refill with sanitiser. In other words, for a huge crowd, this is the best dispenser we can use apart from the spraying chamber, which is very expensive; we are talking of millions.”

Professor Omoleye added that the cost of spraying the sanitiser into hands cost a little more than N1.00 (One Naira) per person, compared to when pressed.

Prodded on the possible commercialisation of the invention when refined and mass-produced, the Professor of Chemical Engineering said that the Standards Organisation of Nigeria might want to inspect it since it had electrical parts because they would want to be sure of safety. He, however, assured that the invention was operated with battery and would not shock anybody, and the lifespan is between 5-10 years.

Professor James Omoleye displays the invented dispenser
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Professor James Omoleye displays the invented dispenser