Expert Seeks Anti-Drug Abuse Units in Tertiary Institutions

Expert Seeks Anti-Drug Abuse Units in Tertiary Institutions

 

The Assistant Commander of Narcotics, National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA), Mr David Enoch Kumchi, has called for the establishment of a drug-free counselling unit and the engagement of the nation’s drugs enforcement agency toward preventing the smuggling of hard drugs into institutions of higher learning. He said this was to create a sustainable drug-free life among upcoming leaders.

While delivering a lecture titled ‘Drug-Free Life and Successful Career Pursuit as Upcoming Leaders’ at a recent Town and Gown seminar in the Department of Political Science and International Relations, Covenant University, Mr Kumchi said it was important for the nation’s leaders of tomorrow to recognize that it was possible to live a drug-free life despite the huge peer-pressure out there. He, however, said they must develop certain coping skills like arming themselves with information about drug and drug abuse, be assertive while rejecting the invitation to participate and be prompt in suggesting alternatives to engaging in drug-related leisure activities.

He advised against associating with drug addicts, situations or places where drugs were used, but engagement in hobbies that helped in the building of capacities and self-esteem. Also, he urged them to be involved in religious activities, stay committed to academic pursuit, and remain obedient to laid down rules and regulations, both in school and the world of work.

Mr Kumchi counselled the audience to confide in their parents, tutors, religious leader or a trusted adult when challenged, and use their understanding of drugs to help their peers and others around them. According to him, “Encourage those using drugs to seek help, report those using or selling drugs to the school authority or law enforcement officials.”

The Guest Speaker highlighted some of the social consequences of drug abuse in the lives of young professionals. These, he said, included loss of job, dropping out or expulsion from school, truancy and deviant behaviour, involvement in criminal activities, destitution, and family disintegration among others.

According to him, the physical consequences of drug addiction were premature deaths, damage to the brain and liver, heart and lung-related diseases and irregular heartbeat, nervous breakdown, poor blood supply and circulation, HIV/AIDS and unwanted pregnancy. He stated that the psychological consequences ranged from psychosis (a severe mental disorder in which thought and emotions are so impaired that contact is lost with external reality), delusions and craving desire, sleeplessness, restlessness, anxiety, depression, and hallucinations.

Mr Kumchi noted that there was no good validation that one could get from drug abuse, as the process of indulging in it, instead of helping one cope with pressure, boredom, mood swings, would rather end up destroying the destiny of one that so engaged in it.

The Assistant Commander of Narcotics, National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA), Mr David Enoch Kumchi, making his presentation at the Department of Political Science and International Relation's Town and Gown Seminar
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The Assistant Commander of Narcotics, National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA), Mr David Enoch Kumchi, making his presentation at the Department of Political Science and International Relation's Town and Gown Seminar